The latest news in clean energy policy & legislation

Image of Eastman Kodak Company and RED finalize deal to transition Eastman Business Park utilities article

Eastman Kodak Company and RED finalize deal to transition Eastman Business Park utilities — Eastman Kodak Company and RED announced the closing of their deal to transition Kodak's utility infrastructure at Eastman Business Park (EBP) to RED. The utilities at EBP, one of the nation's largest industrial complexes, provides electricity, steam, chilled water, compressed air, industrial water, sewer services, nitrogen, natural gas and potable water to the Park's owners and tenants. RED-Rochester plans to make significant investments over the next five years in a variety of energy efficiency projects and to convert the plant from coal to natural gas. Eastman Business Park will serve as a model for how industrial facilities across the country can meet new environmental standards. Read more.

Job openings — RED is searching for top-notch professionals for our new Rochester, NY facility — Project Manager and New Business Development Manager. Read more.

Learn more about clean energy investment and MLPs — RED recently joined Pew, Barclays Capital, and First Solar for a webinar on clean energy investment and master limited partnerships (MLP). MLPs have helped traditional energy industries access vast pools of capital at low cost, supporting a boom in domestic production. As Congress considers tax reform options, bipartisan legislation in both the House and Senate would allow clean energy companies to use these partnerships as a critical tool to grow their business. Read more.

Image of Video shows how to turn heat into power (CHP) article

Video shows how to turn heat into power (CHP) — Pew Charitable Trust’s Clean Energy Program has created a new video highlighting the economic benefits of combined heat and power (CHP). The video begins by explaining that many facilities and neighborhoods were able to keep their power running after Hurricane Sandy because of CHP. It then shows that doubling electricity generation through industrial efficiency technologies could create up to 1 million highly skilled jobs, spur $200 billion in new investment, and increase U.S. competitiveness. Read more.

Image of Turbosteam to increase the sustainability at Lakeland College article

Turbosteam to increase the sustainability at Lakeland College — RED's subsidiary, Turbosteam has partnered with Lakeland College in Alberta, Canada to increase the sustainability of its Lloydminster campus. Turbosteam’s clean-energy project will generate low-cost electricity that reduces the school’s costs, while the steam turbine exhaust will be used to provide campus district heating. Read more.

Image of RED to increase industrial park’s efficiency article

RED to increase industrial park’s efficiency — After negotiations with the Eastman Kodak Company, RED has agreed to acquire, upgrade and operate the utility infrastructure of Eastman Business Park (EBP), one of the nation’s largest industrial complexes. This agreement increases efficiency, cuts greenhouse-gas emissions, provides stability for EBP and its tenant companies, and supports the Park’s revitalization. Read more.

Image of Cogeneration projects benefits company’s bottom line article

Cogeneration projects benefits company’s bottom line — RED and National Gypsum Company (NGC) announced the opening of a CHP project at NGC’s Burlington, New Jersey, facility. The project produces approximately 3.4 megawatts of clean electricity and delivers more than 30 MMBtu of thermal energy each hour of operation, resulting in an overall efficiency of greater than 90 percent. “CHP is benefitting our company’s bottom line,” said John Corsi, Vice President of Manufacturing Operations and Engineering of NGC. Read more.

Image of Cersosimo Lumber speeds toward sustainability, powered by Turbosteam article

Cersosimo Lumber speeds toward sustainability, powered by Turbosteam — Turbosteam (a division of Recycled Energy Development) has delivered a clean energy system to Cersosimo Lumber at its Brattleboro, Vermont hardwood mill. The project will allow Cersosimo to extract energy from the steam they produce to dry lumber in kilns, converting it to approximately 600 kilowatts (kW) of electrical energy at very high efficiencies. The system will utilize waste wood from milling operations used to fuel Cersosimo’s existing biomass boiler, allowing the mill to effectively use its steam three times. Read more.

Image of Obama signs executive order promoting industrial energy efficiency article

Obama signs executive order promoting industrial energy efficiency — While efficiency options often have been highlighted for the residential and commercial sectors, President Obama today focused appropriately on industry, which consumes the most energy and enjoys the most opportunities to reduce waste. The White House’s Executive Order calls for increasing combined heat and power (CHP) and waste heat to power (WHP) by 50 percent by 2020. This 40 gigawatts of new capacity (equal to the output of more than 80 large coal-fired power plants) would lower both costs and pollution. More importantly, such industrial efficiency also will increase the competitiveness and job-creating capabilities of U.S. manufacturers. The executive order was lauded by a diverse set of organizations. Read more.

Image of America’s top scientists have found substantial potential in waste heat recovery article

America’s top scientists have found substantial potential in waste heat recoveryThe National Research Council’s Science and Technology for Sustainability Program organized a meeting in November 2011 of research leaders and technical experts and recently released a report on ways to recover waste heat and how it can contribute to energy sustainability. The report's overarching themes include focussing on the big picture. Read more.

RED and Tulum Trust announce new financing to develop waste energy recycling projects — Recycled Energy Development (RED) announced today a strategic partnership with Tulum Trust, a private equity firm that invests in low carbon energy businesses. Under the terms of the deal, Tulum will provide RED with development funding and project capital, with an initial commitment from Tulum and RED Management of $26 million. In addition, Tulum intends to deploy up to $300 million in projects that RED will develop across North America in the next few years. Read more.

Image of RED acquires CHP projects at Dean Foods facilities article

RED acquires CHP projects at Dean Foods facilities — Recycled Energy Development (RED) has acquired two combined heat and power (CHP) projects at Dean Foods’ facilities. The CHP systems will provide clean, efficiently generated energy to Dean Foods’ processing facilities. By recycling waste heat, the units will help Dean Foods achieve its targeted goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 20 percent from its 2008 baseline, part of the company’s Environmental 2013 Roadmap. Read more.

Image of US senator proposes national Clean Energy Standard (CES) highlighting CHP article

US senator proposes national Clean Energy Standard (CES) highlighting CHPSenator Jeff Bingaman introduced the Clean Energy Standard (CES) Act that highlights the economic and environmental benefits of efficient combined heat and power (CHP) and clean waste energy recovery (WER). The chairman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee claimed his framework “lets the market and American ingenuity determine the best path forward.” Read more.

The battle over centralization — Dick Munson's recent article in The Electricity Journal debates the benefits of conventional centralized energy production — wind, nuclear, or whatever — against distributed or on-site generation. Distributed generation appears to be the winner! Read more.

Image of Put one million Americans to work article

Put one million Americans to work — More than 200 companies signed a full-page advertisement declaring industrial energy efficiency will put a million Americans to work. The ad, coordinated by The Pew Charitable Trusts, explains that U.S. utilities and factories send enough heat up their chimneys to power all of Japan. But with existing, proven technologies, we can harness that wasted energy, dramatically cut electricity costs, and make our manufacturers more competitive. Read more.

Business groups ask Obama to target energy efficiency to reduce greenhouse gas — In letters to the President delivered yesterday, business groups as diverse as the Industrial Energy Consumers of America (representing major manufacturing sectors such as cement, paper, chemicals and steel), the Ohio Business Council for a Clean Economy, Ingersoll Rand and Recycled Energy Development all agree and are asking for the same thing: EPA should make energy efficiency front and center as it adopts regulations to set greenhouse gas standards for power plants under the Clean Air Act. Read more.

Image of Bipartisan flash – Distributed generation makes sense article

Bipartisan flash – Distributed generation makes sense — The liberal Brookings Institution and the conservative Hoover Institution finally agree on something — distributed power systems (DPS). The two think-tank behemoths found DPS to have “the potential to make a significant positive contribution to the U.S. power system." The report pays particular attention to combined heat and power, lamenting that CHP is “homeless” since energy efficiency advocates think it will detract from their preferred lighting and appliance standards, renewable energy advocates argue it will divert benefits from solar collectors and wind turbines, and utility lobbyists worry independent cogenerators will take away their load and customers. The report, in contrast, argues CHP needs a home in the minds of all policymakers, since cogeneration offers environmental benefits as well as “the added security benefit of being able to operate independently of the grid and greatly superior efficiency.” Read more.

Image of Create markets and watch clean energy flourish article

Create markets and watch clean energy flourish — In a little understood recent decision, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) declared PURPA is still an effective tool and can be used to provide technology-specific long-term contracts for clean power. A new report encourages FERC to go further, to build on the California decision and encourage the development of clean and efficient power technologies. Written by Carolyn Elefant and commissioned by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, Reviving PURPA calls on FERC to clarify and reform the Byzantine state patchwork that sets unreasonably low prices for electricity from renewable energy and cogeneration. Read more.

FERC should create markets for ancillary services from clean energy projects — The Business Council for Sustainable Energy submitted comments to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintaining that robust ancillary services markets will yield many benefits, including grid reliability, integration of clean energy resources, and cost savings for ratepayers. Ancillary services markets also can encourage technological innovation if there are clear price signals to stimulate more flexible resources. Read more.

Image of RED and National Gypsum Company (NGC) announced the development of CHP project in NJ article

RED and National Gypsum Company (NGC) announced the development of CHP project in NJ — RED and National Gypsum Company (NGC) announced the development of a combined heat and power (CHP) project at NGC’s Burlington, New Jersey facility. The project, which was supported by the State of New Jersey, will produce approximately 3.4 megawatts of clean electricity and deliver more than 210,000 MMBtu of thermal energy, resulting in an overall efficiency of greater than 90 percent. Read more.

Image of Tom Casten interviewed on Marketplace Radio article

Tom Casten interviewed on Marketplace Radio — Eve Troeh of the Marketplace Sustainability Desk, reports that steam used to be used to heat and power cities, but people didn't like the pollution from the power plants so they were moved away. Troeh interviews Tom Casten who explains that you can't send steam more than a few miles, so these power plants now just let extra heat float into the air. Casten says power plants today are much cleaner and he wants to put them back in city centers, build more pipes, and use all that wasted heat. Read more.

Image of Oak Ridge National Lab states that US industries can promote a clean energy economy article

Oak Ridge National Lab states that US industries can promote a clean energy economy — A recent study by Oak Ridge National Laboratory finds efficiency, particularly combined heat and power (CHP), would make U.S. industry more competitive as it also cuts manufacturers’ energy costs and greenhouse gas emissions. “The U.S. industrial sector,” state the researchers, “presents a large and significant opportunity to promote a clean energy economy.” Of its seven policy options, the laboratory highlights output-based emission standards and a federal energy portfolio standard with CHP – proposals that long have been a focus of Recycled Energy Development. Read more.

Image of RED takes EPA to the MACT on industrial efficiency article

RED takes EPA to the MACT on industrial efficiency — The Alliance for Industrial Efficiency recently submitted comments to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on its “Boiler MACT,” a set of rules to reduce hazardous air pollutants from the nation’s industrial boilers. MACT stands for the “maximum available control technology” standards that must be met by these boilers. The Alliance views the rules as an important means to enhance industrial efficiency, especially through the use of waste heat recovery (WHR) and combined heat and power (CHP) projects. Read more.

Image of RED submits comments to FERC on CHP article

RED submits comments to FERC on CHP — RED and the Alliance for Industrial Efficiency have submitted comments to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on how CHP and waste heat recovery (WHR) projects should be compensated for the reliability and stabilization benefits they provide to the electric grid. FERC can simultaneously foster grid reliability and industrial efficiency. At the moment, such reliability is generally supplied by inefficient single-cycle gas turbines. WHR and CHP provide superior alternatives. Read more.

Casten wants factories and power plants to turn pollution into zero-emission electricity — In the Bloomberg Businessweek interview, RED’s Tom Casten says, “There’s been some awakening by policy makers that energy we get from waste is as clean as wind or solar or geothermal. Through cogeneration and capturing waste heat a factory already emits, we could cut CO2 emissions by about 20 percent and save about $100 billion a year.” Read more.

Image of Is Waste Energy Sustainable? article

Is Waste Energy Sustainable? — In an EnergyBiz article, Tom Casten explains that the line losses in the US cost $26 billion and emitted 160 million tons of carbon dioxide in 2010 alone. Line losses rise dramatically during peak hours and tie up a huge amount of generation and transmission capacity, which limits new wind and solar generation access. Tom details how local waste energy recycling projects can significantly reduce the line losses, free existing transmission to carry wind, provide less expensive wind and solar backup, and generate sustainable base load power. Read more.

Distributed generation to be highlighted at climate conference — RED’s Sean Casten will co-chair the distributed generation track at the Creating Climate Wealth Summit. This track will focus on solar power, small wind, geothermal, and cogeneration. The local nature of the power production gives end users control over their electricity source and price, and also enhances security by avoiding large blackouts and vulnerabilities associated with the electricity grid. The Carbon War Room, the conference’s organizer, says, “With new power plant regulations set to retire 20 percent of all coal capacity in the USA and transmission projects still facing stiff barriers, it looks like distributed generation is the way to go.” Read more.

Image of Treasury Grant Program for CHP extended another year article

Treasury Grant Program for CHP extended another year — The tax bill signed into law on Dec. 17 extends the Treasury Grant Program for CHP through the end of 2011. Created in 2009, the program defrays the cost of constructing a CHP facility by allowing companies without taxable income to instead take approved tax credits as grants. Read more.

Energy recycling continues to gain traction in the mediaMcClatchy Newspapers interviewed Sean Casten for a feature story that ran in newspapers and websites across the country, making more and more people aware of the economic and environmental benefits of this proven technology. Read more.

Image of EPA gives nod to energy recycling article

EPA gives nod to energy recycling — EPA’s recently issued guidance for greenhouse gas emissions permits (PSD and Title V Permitting Guidance for Greenhouse Gases) makes energy efficiency the centerpiece of its compliance options. It recognizes energy recycling techniques including combined heat and power (CHP) and waste heat recovery as cost-effective ways to cut our nation’s greenhouse pollution. It also explicitly mentions CHP and waste heat recovery as Best Available Control Technologies (BACT), which will allow industrial plants to employ energy recycling techniques as a way to satisfy EPA’s permitting requirements. Read more.

Image of Crain’s Cleveland Business op-ed on industrial efficiency tax incentives article

Crain’s Cleveland Business op-ed on industrial efficiency tax incentives — Prominent Ohio businessman Lonnie Coleman argues that improved energy efficiency is the key to making American manufacturing more competitive, pointing out that energy recycling is one of the best ways to improve efficiency. As such, Congress should do its part to encourage energy efficiency by passing investment tax credits for combined heat and power and other forms of energy recycling. He writes, "The proposed bipartisan legislation... will maximize the economic and environmental benefits of energy recycling, giving business the means to make their energy work twice. With that help, more... businesses can thrive, putting more [people] back to work." Read more.

Image of Energy recycling featured in the Toronto Star article

Energy recycling featured in the Toronto StarTyler Hamilton, energy and technology columnist for the Toronto Star, shines a spotlight on energy recycling in his latest piece. He writes, "Clearly we don’t give enough consideration to the problem of waste heat... Making products, processes and facilities more efficient to begin with is one way to reduce waste heat, but the other is to capture that heat and recycle it into, say, electricity or steam for an industrial process or hot water for heating a new residential community." Tyler often demonstrates this principal using a windmill which is powered by the hot air rising from a cup of coffee. Recycling heat into energy is "no different, really, than how we recycle plastic bottles [...] into park benches." Read more.

Image of Support swells for recycled energy and combined heat and power tax incentives article

Support swells for recycled energy and combined heat and power tax incentives — A growing coalition of business, labor, and environmental organizations has rallied in support of investment tax credits for combined heat and power and energy recycling projects. The Alliance for Industrial Efficiency sent letters to the Senate Finance and House Ways and Means Committees, urging them to ensure their final tax packages contain a provision that will strengthen US manufacturing competitiveness while benefitting the environment. Since last spring, the number of organizations supporting the effort has swelled to 122, and now includes such new notables as the United Steelworkers, The Pew Environment Group and ArcelorMittal. Read more.

Image of Sean Casten on the silver screen article

Sean Casten on the silver screenCarbon Nation, the new documentary featuring Sean Casten and RED is a “positive, solutions-based, non-preachy, non-partisan, big tent film about tackling climate change while boosting the economy.” Sean appears in the film to lend his expertise about energy recycling. Read more.

Image of Chicago Council on Global Affairs names RED’s Craig Bennett an “Emerging Leader” article

Chicago Council on Global Affairs names RED’s Craig Bennett an “Emerging Leader” — Established in 2008 with support from the McCormick Foundation, the goal of the Chicago Council’s Emerging Leaders Program is to identify and engage future leaders from the government, private, and nonprofit sectors who will help Chicago compete and thrive in the global era. Each Emerging Leaders two-year class examines, discusses, and makes recommendations on timely policy issues—including energy and the environment, the global economy, foreign policy, and migration. This isn't the first time someone from RED has been named an Emerging Leader…Sean Casten, RED’s president, is a member of the Class of 2009. Read more.

Image of Energy efficiency critical to U.S. economy article

Energy efficiency critical to U.S. economy — Tom Casten appeared on MSNBC along with T. Boone Pickens and Peter Diamandis of the X Prize Foundation to discuss solutions to the energy crisis. Tom said, “We really need to understand that the issue is our utility and regulatory system. Utilities got to 34 percent efficiency when Eisenhower was in the White House. They’re still at the same level today. We throw away two-thirds of the energy and it causes many of the problems we have... You [need to] build power plants where you can recycle the heat the way Edison did... Efficiency has to be the fuel of the future." Read more.

Image of The Other Green Energy article

The Other Green EnergyFox News visits the energy recycling project at the Arcelor Mittal steel plant in Indiana, and notes that recycled energy, which it calls “The Other Green Energy,” has massive potential to slash energy costs and carbon emissions at the same time. Fox interviewed RED’s Tom Casten, who explained that as a nation we are sending hundreds of billions of dollars worth of waste energy up in smoke every year when instead we could be capturing and turning it into useful, clean power. “We are the Saudi Arabia of waste heat,” he said. “You can either use it or lose it.” Read more.

The Missing Efficiency — Energy efficiency advocates often seem to miss the big picture when looking for the best ways to get more bang for their energy buck, argues Dick Munson in an article in Electricity Journal. Conventional wisdom says it’s all about the little things — changing our light bulbs, for instance, or putting more insulation in our homes. Those are the hot ticket items that make environmentally-minded consumers feel like they’re making a difference. But the reality is we could do far more to cut global warming emissions if we paid attention to something far less sexy but far more consequential: the way power is actually generated. Read more.

Image of America needs clean energy article

America needs clean energy — Tom Casten writes in the Chicago Tribune that the dramatic images of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico serve as a stark reminder that America needs to transition to a new clean energy economy. It's time for Congress to get serious and enact a bill that will promote cleaner domestic power sources, cut our oil addiction and reduce global warming pollution. Waiting for tomorrow's leaders to solve today's problems will only increase the ultimate costs of tackling this challenge. (Photo of oil slick after spill in Gulf of Mexico courtesy Tasha Tully via Creative Commons license.) Read more.

Sean Casten at Virtual Energy Forum — Energy waste is pervasive, creating a massive opportunity for US industrials to lower their energy costs and reduce their CO2 footprint. In spite of this opportunity, our economic and environmental policies are largely in conflict with each other, framing a win for one as a loss for the other. Sean's presentation focussed on the fundamentals that are placing upward pressure on US electricity costs, and provide case studies of industrials who have taken control of their own energy future by recovering waste energy. Sean concluded with an overview of the broader industrial opportunity and how to capture it. Read more.

Image of Fuel Swap article

Fuel Swap — “Simply by ramping up our nation’s generation of electricity from underutilized natural gas plants and ramping down our generation from coal, the United States could reduce its total CO2 footprint by 14 to 20 percent tomorrow with no disruption in access to energy services and no new infrastructure investments.” So concludes Sean Casten in the latest issue of Public Utilities Fortnightly. He notes that the congressional proposal to reduce emissions by 17 percent over ten years is “constrained only by its ambition.” Read more.

Image of When Gray is Green article

When Gray is Green — In the latest issue of The Nation, Lisa Margonelli makes the case for increased use of “gray power” sources, especially waste heat, across the Midwest and South. Calling these regions “the Colossus of Carbon,” she cites a RED analysis revealing the immense amounts of electricity that could be generated from waste energy at manufacturing plants in places like Ohio. “All those smokestacks,” she says, “hold the potential for a lower-carbon renaissance.” Read more.

Image of Bringing energy recycling to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) article

Bringing energy recycling to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) — RED Chairman Tom Casten recently led a symposium on energy recycling at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) 2010 annual meeting. Although conventional wisdom assumes that mitigating climate change will raise the cost of energy, this symposium will present a contrary view: that many proven technologies can substantially increase the efficiency of generating heat and power, cutting energy costs and greenhouse gas emissions simultaneously. View Tom's presentation "Gray Is the New Green: How Energy Recycling Curbs Both Global Warming and Power Costs. Read more.

A carbon-free future — RED public policy associate Melissa Mullarkey argues in Trends that capturing waste energy would help the U.S. transition into a carbon-free future. While we need to wean ourselves off of fossil fuels entirely, that can’t happen overnight. In the meantime, we have to start making big reductions in our greenhouse gas emissions so we can avoid the worst effects of catastrophic climate change. Energy efficiency, Melissa says—especially through technologies like combined heat & power (aka cogeneration)—is the best way to get here. Read more.

RED featured in Chief Executive magazine — The massive potential of energy recycling — and the counter-productive barriers it faces — is explored in the current issue of Chief Executive. The piece, penned by libertarian journalist Ronald Bailey, features RED Chairman Tom Casten. "Utilities have traditionally made money on how much they invest, not how efficient they are," Tom is quoted as saying. "It's the only industry that increases its profits when a company redecorates its president's office." Read more.

Image of Casten wins Platts Lifetime Achievement and Inspiring Efficiency leadership awards article

Casten wins Platts Lifetime Achievement and Inspiring Efficiency leadership awards — Clean energy guru and RED founder Tom Casten has received the Platts Lifetime Achievement Award for his work creating ultra-efficient energy systems in the U.S. Over the past three decades at several energy firms, Tom has developed and managed 250 clean power projects valued at more than $2 billion. One of those projects at an Indiana steel plant generated more clean electricity in 2006 than all the grid-connected solar panels in the world.

Tom also won the annual Inspiring Efficiency leadership award from the Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (MEEA). The award honors Tom's long record of success as a businessman and advocate in the field of industrial energy efficiency. MEEA promotes energy efficiency in the Midwest as a means of achieving sustainable economic development and environmental preservation. Read more.

Tackle climate change rapidly — Sean Casten's article in Spark argues that the current climate-change debate is based on a false assumption — that many decades are needed before greenhouse gas pollution can be cut. In fact, history is rife with examples of rapid change in the power sector. Read more.

Image of The New Republic article

The New Republic — The annual energy issue touches on how to diversify and improve our power system as we deal with climate change—through decentralization, waste energy recycling and more. Tom Casten’s efforts to lower greenhouse emissions and cut energy costs for manufacturers are cited. Read more.

Image of ACEEE honors Tom Casten article

ACEEE honors Tom Casten — The American Council for an Energy-Efficiency Economy (ACEEE) has selected RED Chairman Tom Casten as a 2009 Champion of Energy Efficiency, calling him “perhaps the most viable and effective advocate for clean distributed energy for the past three decades.” Read more.

Image of Worldwatch Institute article

Worldwatch Institute — The Worldwatch Institute argues that intercepting waste energy streams “can add a huge boost to the U.S. production of affordable, carbon-free, energy. … Energy recycling from fossil fuel-burning plants can help us make the transition to renewables much sooner.” The article concludes that recycling the energy content of all U.S. smokestack waste could replace about 30 percent of the electricity now produced by burning fossil fuels. Read more.

The New Republic — Sean Casten commends Obama for insisting that efficiency will play a major role in the country’s energy policy. But Sean stresses that the focus should not be on how consumers use power but instead on how energy is generated in the first place. Read more.

Image of Nature Magazine article

Nature MagazineNature declares that waste heat from industrial plants and electricity-generating stations represent a huge amount of lost energy. Tom Casten is quoted saying, “Separate generation of electricity and heat is utter madness.” He points out that over a century ago, Thomas Edison built an electric plant in Manhattan which sent its waste heat through pipes to warm nearby buildings. Read more.

Image of Smithsonian article

Smithsonian — The publication’s on-line edition features an interview with Tom Casten explaining how to capture power that goes up in smoke. According to Tom, “I became convinced in about 1974 or 1975 that global warming caused by carbon dioxide emissions is going to be the biggest issue that we’ve ever faced as human beings and that we have to burn less fossil fuel and learn to reduce CO2 emissions profitably.” Read more.

Contact us to discuss how energy recycling can help your organization.